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20130121
20130129
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KRCB (PBS) 26
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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
our competitive edge. some say it's because america's fragile economy is a distraction for corporate america. others point to our inferior infrastructure and sub-par public education. but adam segal, author of "advantage," says the big problem is others are gaining ground. >> we have been kind of running in place for the last three or four years because of the recession, spending on r&d, and big ideas seem to be fairly scarce while china just continues to funnel more and more money into it. >> reporter: still many argue the u.s. will always be extremely competitive because we are t most innovative country in the world. what better place to witness innovation at work than at i.b.m. in westchester county, new york. this is the home of watson, big blue's super computer. watson was clever enough to beat "jeopardy" champions at their own game just a few years ago. now, i.b.m. researchers are working on new uses for the brainiac computer, particularly in the field of medicine. bernie meyerson calls himself i.b.m.'s head geek. he says innovation is critical for companies and societies to su
there project that the country's economy will grow 2.5% in the coming fiscal year. that's due to stimulus measures and a global economic recovery. a large scale economic package will push up the gross domestic product. they forecast a moderate global economic recovery will lift corporate sentiment and boost spending on plant and equipment. the officials expect people will rush toake more purchases including things like houses before a plant consumption tax hike in april 2014. the government has concluded that the economy will expand 5 2.5% in real terms and 2.7% in nominal terms. based on the assumption that prices will pick up modestly the government projects nominal growth will exceed real growth for the first time in 16 years. the dollar is gaining further ground against the yen. earlier it hit a high. now it's changing hands to 39 yen. traders have seen rates drop to a five-year low. that's provided a brighter outlook for the american economy. the consumer price index dropped in december for a second month running as well. the euro i trading higher and that's being quoted at 120.77
hadley and zbigniew brzezinski weigh in. >> brown: paul solman looks at china's fast growing economy and asks, is it headed for a crash? >> wages are rising for the burgeoning middle class, but for hardscrabble factory workers: mounting protests against livle wages d woing conditions. >> ifill: and vice president joe biden hangs out with hari sreenivasan on google plus to talk about gun violence. >> make your voices heard. this town listens when people rise up and speak. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the u.s. military has a new order of the day: working up plans for putting women on the front lines. the process was se
have been overly optimistic on the economy. and, we've seen autos really rebounding over the last year. we're really starting to see improvement in the housing market. so, i think those are some very fundamental pieces of the economy that could really lead to some stronger growth in the future. >> reporter: as for retail investors rediscovering stocks this january, not everyone thinks the reunion is for real. some experts say the market will have to rally a lot longer before that happens. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: from a smartphone in your hand to a smartphone in your glasses, still ahead, the latest fashion trend: wearable technology. exxon-mobil is back on top. it's reclaimed the coveted title as the world's most valuable company. apple now slips to number two. exxon is woh an estimated $417 billion a apple is $4 billion less. since apple hit $700 a share in september. it has lost roughly $250 billion in value. the change comes exactly one year after the tech titan knocked the oil giant out of the top spot. shares of microsoft ended flat today, after posting quarte
've heard from our republican colleagues economic uncertainty is bad for the economy. guess what? it is. and yet that's exactly what you are doing. another big dose of economic uncertainty. >> reporter: republicans shifted gears on the debt ceiling after a strategy session last week. worried that they have lost the public debate, republicans were clearly trying out a new message tod. >> balancing the budget over the next ten years means we save the future for our kids and our grandkids. it also means that we strengthen programs like social security and medicare and medicaid that can't continue to exist in current form without some kind of controls. >> reporter: there is just one problem. democrats argue the "no budget no pay provision" violates the constitution's 27th amendment which says any changes congress makes in its pay can't take effect until after the next election. >> we should not say to a member, "if you think the budget before you is not good for the country, vote against it and you won't get paid. if you think it's not good for the country, you better vote for it because yo
of the federal reserve, talks with us about the debt crisis, the economy and the fed. alan blinder joins us. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: just a single cent higher. earnings from software "giant" microsoft were only a penny more than what anysts were expecting. microsoft shares slipped as much as 2% on the news in after hours trading. here are the numbers: microsoft earned $0.76 a share, down 3.7% from a year ago. revenues rose more than 2.5% to $21.5 billion, but also below expectations. the results mark the first quarter to include sales of microsoft's new windows 8 operating system, and its tablet computer, the "surface". sales of its windows division jumped 24%, but no financial details on the surface tablet. wel haveore analysis on microsoft, in a just a moment. >> tom: the other big tech story today: apple and its big fall following yesterday's lackluster results. the stock lost 12% of its value or $63 a share, closing at $450 and change. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: no doubt this was a sour day for investors. not only did the stock log its largest dolla
for the first time in three years as european credit woes continue to weigh on the global economy. officials announce on tuesday that nearly 200 million people worldwide were jobless in 2012. that's an increase of more than 4 million from the previous year. officials say unemployment grew not only in western countries but also in east asia and the middle east. nay say european debt problems affected emerging economies by hurting trade. youth unemployment is also on the rise. people aged 15 to 24 are counted for over a third of the tot number. officials are urging governments to boost job training programs for young people. looking ahead officials say global unemployment will continue to rise this year to over 220 million. they site the sluggish global economic recovery as a reason. south korean journalts have voted toyota motors camry car of the year. representatives from the japanese automaker collected the trophy for the u.s. built sedan at a ceremony in seoul. the journalists praised the cars price competitiveness. it beat 44 models introduced last year including vehicles by bmw. toyota e
economy. they're celebrating the 50th anniversary of reconciliation. the elysee treaty was signed in 1963. commemorative events were held tuesday in britain -- in berlin, that is. french and german ministers held a joint cabinet meeting in the city. german chancellor angela america 8 and french president francois hollande made a statement together in parliament to emphasize their ties. they say they're determined to boost cooperation to help europe overcome its challenges. merkel said germany and france will soon make joi proposals to deepen economic integration in the eu. >>> the european debt crisis has revealed rifts between member countries. but merkel and hollande say they hope the celebrations will highlight the e.u.'s ties. >>> and now let's get a check on markets. first taking a look at the currencies, the dollar is lower against the yen as traders are taking profits following the recent advance. the dollar against the yen changing hands at 88.74-76. the u.s. currency was trading at the 89-yen level before the bank of japan announcements. market players see the outcome of the b.o.
as the whole economy can pick up again, at least a little. >> the tax measures by italy's technocrat government under the prime minister are another weapon in the country's never- ending fight against tax evasion. the so-called financial police is seeking to recover an estimated 150 billion euros, and it is coming down hard on the country's culture of tax evasion. >> we are conducting stringent checks on luxury vehicles. if the income tax returns filed by an owner indicates he could never afford such a vehicle, then we check up on the driver and his business and compare the data to see if it matches up. if it does not, we press charges. >> they show us video footage of controls at the swiss border. officers are seeking to prevent and declared in come from leaving italy. from headquarters in rome, authorities keep close watch on luxury yachts, monitoring vessels in the ports. they found numerous owners who have failed to pay taxes. >> the fance pole chk tax returns for offenses that need to be prosecuted. we take legal action against any instance of tax evasion and then cover falsified statement
wasn't expecting him to give a detailed analysis of the economy today and what needs to be changed. i'm not suggesting that's not important but i was hearing him speak about lofty ideas of equality and freedom brown: yet he did point to some specific things as we heard in gwen's set-up >> that is true when it came to global warming or addressing the global climate change, i think we have to be willing to address these things. >> brown: trey grayson, what did you hear? >> i heard a pretty visionary, pretty articulate speech, articulate in a progressive vision for the country. i would agree with ramesh that the lack of the economy or references to the deficit in his speech was a little surprising given that that's the... probably the biggest issue of today (audio is) the fiscal cliff and everything else. and the fact that that was the number one issue on voters' minds even at the thematic level that was missing and a bit of a surprise >> brown: to stay with you, were you surprised by the emphasis on things such as gay rights or climate change, some of the specifics that he did point to?
, or maybe it's that the economy is finally building a stronger foundation. whatever the cause, the effect is that the dow, s&p 500 and nasdaq are all are up more than 4% in the first three weeks of this year. wall street veteran art cashin says with interest rates still so low, investors have a new taste for equities, particularly pension funds. >> they've got to up their risk profile, and therefore they're going to buy stocks. and some of that money is coming in not wildly, not open-armed, but somewhat reluctantly. but this is the only road i can take. >> reporter: even with all the positive momentum on wall street, there's still a bit of nervousness about earnings season. less than 20% of s&p 500 names have reported, and so far the results are just okay. a close look at the numbers show 62% of companies have topped wall street expectations. that's in line with the average since 1994 but below the 65% of the past year. still, it's the red flags companies like dupont are raising about this year that are getting noticed. today, the largest u.s. chemical firm tempered expectations about its
growth will reach 3.5% this year. that's up from 3.2% in 2012. the imf says the euro zone economy will recover more slowly than previously expected. the imf's growth forecast for the united states is 2%. that's as long as the country contains its fiscal crisis including the debt ceiling and fiscal growth. the imf has mained growth outlook for the japanese economy for 1.2% this year. they were warned about the risks of accumulating debt without consolidation measures. >> when the countries start with ray otio of debt to gdp, in bot cases it's much above. we vowed a clear plan for fiscal consolidation over the next five, ten years, it seems to many to be quite dangerous to increase the fiscal deficit. >> the u.s. house of representatives have agreed to raise the debt ceiling until may 18th. the bill will prevent the government from defaulting on its debt. the bill passed the house on wednesday ter t republican majority changed its stance. republicans said they would not approve the bill unless the government made more cuts to social programs. republicans had public criticism that th
, the others, to say we're never going to restore a decent economy here if working people have no rights. if people can't bargain with their employers, there's no place in the world where people who can't bargain raise their wages. in fact they get wage cuts on a continuing basis. and so i think that our strategy is to link core issues together so that it's not just quote, "labor," or particularly organized labor, as you said 12%, and that includes the public sector. private sector's under seven percent. it's notust labor talking about work's rhts. it's a of who have a vision of economic justice, let's do something about economic inequality. let's figure out how to stimulate the demand side of the economy because you need rising wages to have rising demand to get the economy going again. i think it's that kind of an agenda. and you know, in our view, what we talk to our members about, i was at a meeting in california of young new stewards on saturday, is this is seven to ten years. and, you know, i've been doing this my whole life. and i may not be there at the end of that period, but i
are dismantling our economy to do absolutely nothing for the global climate. if you have china and india do what we are doing, intending to do, you would actually make a change that would make a difference. otherwise, what we're doing is dismantling our industry and essentially exporting it to china and india, where all of the carbon pollution is coming from. >> dealing with china and india is the job of the state department. hillary clinton. >> we were misled and there were protests and that the assault sprang out of that. >> with all due respect, we have four dead americans because of a protest or was it guys out for a walk that decided they would kill americans? what difference, at this point, does it make? it is our job to figure out what happened and figure out -- do everything we can to prevent it from happening again. >> the issue was the attack on our coulatin benghazi, took four lives, and with reference from we just heard, susan rice's comments on tv. one member of congress said clinton had allowed the consulate to become a death trap. what have we learned from these hearings? >> demag
if that's possible. the only other thing i would say i think he needs to think about the economy even if it's beginning to recover there's still a problem for the manufacturing base not being here, for are kids not being trained correctly, for getting more jobs that are really good jobs for people here. there's a lot of ideas that have been put forth but they need to be focused in a certain way, the idea if you work hard you really can get ahead in this country just like people did in the old days. >> rose: i want to come back to that. michael. >> there are all sorts of reasons for optimism but since we're talking about history, one cautionary note. lbj at the beginning of 1965 i think bob will confirm this, said to his staff you may think i can do anything. big land lied, big democratic congress. actually i got six months because i'm going to ask members of congress to make sacrifices. they're going to start rebelling and it turns out much what we think was a great society was passed at the very beginning of that term. >> rose: what's the window of opportunity, is it a hundred days
, brought in bob gates and began to move to slightly more of a center position before the economy collapsed. >> rose: so what's the challenge for president obama in the second term? >> it's mense, brendan sullivan one of the great defense lawyers here in washington always says when you're in a negotiation and you have the upper hand as obama has had in the first term and may continue in the second term, when you have that upper hand and you beat your opponent you need to let them leave the field with dignity. and that is not obama's style. if you google "obama rebukes republicans" it goes on and on andn. he is always going after the people -- his beating. just a tactically i think that's a mistake and hopefully it will change. on the foreign affairs front if you talk to the intelligence people they say that the world is increasingly dangerous, you have meltdown situations potential meltdown situations not just in syria and the middle east, pakistan, north korea whh hashe bomben like iran and that is just ticking away. there's the egypt problem, there's what's going on recently in algeria an
was geithner's last day, after four years on the job. in a final interview, he said he's hopeful the economy will strengthen this year. the defense department has begun eliminating the jobs of all 46,000 temporary civilian employees at the pentagon. the announcement today said it's a response to mandatory, across- the-board spending cuts. they're scheduled to take effect march 1, unless congress comes up with aernative cuts. without changes, hundreds of thousands of full-time civilian employees will face furloughs and reduced paychecks by april. the government of syria called today for thousands of refugees to come home, including those opposed to the regime. nearly 600,000 syrians have fled the civil war and gone to neighboring countries. there's been a new surge this week. we have a report narrated by alex thomson of independent television news. >> the children say they double-checked their figures. they counted around 10,000 children in the overcrowded camps in jordan in just the past 24 hours, with the parents or gardens they recognized around 20,000 people in all. with the winter cold a
newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: washington and the nation were witness again today to the quadrennial pomp and color of a presidential inauguration. it marked the public start to the second obama administration, and it featured presidential appeals to extend prosperity and full freedoms to all americans. as the sun rose over the nation's capital on this monday hundreds of thousands of people began descending on the national mall to witness the occasion. officials estimated 500-700,000 attendees. that was far fewer than four years ago when nearly two million turned out. but today's crowd gave no hint of diminished enthusiasm for t
: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributionto your pb stionrom ewerlikyou. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org
is they've lined up support for sanctions and they're hurting the iranian economy. but the-- unfortunately, the-- what hasn't yet happened is it hasn't slowed down the program to a point where people can be comfortable about it, and there doesn't yet appear to be a significant diplomatic opening. >> rose: and the centrifuges are spinning. >> the next six to eight months people say will be an important time. itill be after the israel electi, which was yesterday, and before, perhaps, the iranian election. so poem stoims say the next six months are decisive, but perhaps these six months may actually be disoifs. >> rose: what is amazing to me-- if you think about it you had the israeli election, the u.s. election, the choice change in power, and you have iranian elections coming up. so it suggests that, you know, no matter how debates go, there are always new forces entering them which can have now agendas and wesponsibities and y never know how any of that might change, and that's what makes it so interesting. thank you, michael gordon. thank you david ignatius. >> thanks, charlie,. >> thank
economy requires railroads and highways to speed travel and commerce, schools and colleges to train our workers. gether we discovered that a free market only -- and fair play. together we resolve that a great nation must care for the vulnerable and protect its people from life's worst hazards and misfortunes. through it all we have never relinquished, nor have we succumb to the fiction that all society's ills can be cured through government alone. our celebration of initiatives and enterprise, our insistence on hard work and personal responsibility, these are constant in our character. we have always understood that when times change so must we. that fidelity to our funding principles requires new responses to new challenges. our individual requires collective tion, the american people can no more meet the demands of today's world by acting alone than american soldiers that met the forces of fascism or communism with musicales and militias, no single person can train all the math and science teachers we'll need to equip our children for the future or builds the roads and networks and re
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)

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